Tag Archives: exercise

Fad Dieting

fad dieting

A friend of mine recommended a great article The Weight Loss Trap:  Why Your Diet Isn’t Working.  It’s about why diet fads don’t work for everyone.  I’d be lying if I didn’t include my newly adopted veganism as a fad.  The truth lies in the fact that no one diet works for everyone.

A particular diet that used to work at one stage of your life, may no longer serve its purpose later in life.  For example.  Most teens and young adults simply exercise more and restrict calories to for weight management as oppose to most middle aged adults who tend to utilize a more nutrient dense approach.

As we grow, age, and live in this world with its many exposures to toxins and chemicals what we need to maintain a healthy weight changes, and our perception of health in general changes.  Ultimately we tend to gravitate to what makes us feel the best.

Recognizing the need to change is key.  It’s not a one size fits all or even a one lifetime fits all approach that we need to take.  We must constantly reassess how our body is reacting to the foods we eat and adjust accordingly.

As I teach my patients, make your own recipe for life.  My recipe will not work for your health and weight loss goals.  Your goals can only be met by an effort that is reflective of you, something custom built—so custom, you are the only one that can do it.

The TIME HEALTH article points out that, dietary staples such as eating breakfast every day, daily exercise, weekly weigh ins, and limited screen time consistently contribute to a healthy weight.  Everything else is quite variable among individuals to produce success.

From my perspective there are several key questions to ask yourself when assessing your diet:

  • How is your inflammation today?  I check to see how easily my rings come on and off, how easily my knees can bend.
  • How is your overall pain today?  If I make a poor food decision for my body, I’m often achy and have increased pain.
  • How is your mood?  Is it fluctuating?  Do these fluctuations occur before or after eating?
  • What are your energy levels like throughout the day?  I take note if I am experiencing mid-day or early evening crashes.
  • How is your sleep, and how do you feel when you wake up?  I notice if I slept solidly or tossed and turned as well as whether or not I wake feeling rested or exhausted.

By making it more about how you feel, you will gravitate to a diet that will naturally promote a healthy weight.

This is not an exhaustive list but can be applied to any diet or health decision you may be making from quitting coffee, to cutting gluten or dairy.  Some people function perfectly fine on 3 cups of coffee a day, others have severe mood fluctuations.  Some can drink alcohol, some can’t, some can enjoy chocolate daily, and others can’t.

For me, right now, I feel veganism is the right way to go!  Please note that I have tried many dietary approaches, that produce effective results; however, it’s a constant evaluation process—don’t forget change is the key when something doesn’t feel quite right.

I strongly encourage you to check out The Weight Loss Trap:  Why Your Diet Isn’t Working at http://time.com/4793832/the-weight-loss-trap/ for more details and all the scientific explanations!

You can find me on the web and FB at www.AlternativePTFortWorth.com and on Twitter and Instagram @alternative_pt.

Check out some pretty awesome vegan nutrition, skincare, and makeup at www.AmandaHazel.Arbonne.com

Reference

Sifferlin, Alexandra.  The Weight Loss Trap:  Why Your Diet Isn’t Working.  TIME Helath.  Accessed June 15, 2017.  http://time.com/4793832/the-weight-loss-trap/

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5 Things Everyone Can Do NOW To Be Happy and Healthy

5 Things EVERYONE…despite disease, disability, and pain…can safely do NOW to create a happier, healthier life.  No need to wait until after Christmas or the New Year.  Let’s make some positive changes!

  • Eat healthy
  • Bike or swim
  • Yoga and breath practice
  • Meditate and pray
  • Create and help others

Eat healthy:  Many of you will skip this explanation because you’ve heard in a thousand times.  I hate to beat a dead horse but seriously…eat the produce aisle.

Bike or swim:  I don’t care what physical deficits or injury you may have.  One of these two will work.  In severe cases (those with para or quadriplegia or wheelchair bound) assistance may be required and the pool may be the only option.  The benefits of elevating the heartrate are phenomenal for hormonal balance, happiness, heart and lung health, and a sense of purpose and accomplishment.

Yoga and breath practice:  If yoga is too difficult, begin with breath practice.  If you are conscious and breathing, you can perform breath practice.  Research beginners breath practice, slow steady breathing, diaphragmatic breathing, or breath awareness practices.  Breath practice is a standalone practice or a great addition to a yoga practice.

Meditate and pray:  Again, if you are conscious and breathing, you can meditate and pray.  Incorporate this into your daily life.  A little bit of research on the internet or iTunes will get you plenty of free resources to use.

Create and help othersThis is the most important of the five. We must perform work to complete our human task.  It’s essential to health and wellness.  Holding a formal job is not necessary.  Each week commit a minimum of 1-2 days focusing on giving back.  Giving back creates an environment of enablement as oppose to the tangled forest of a disablement, disease, and dysfunction.  Your work can be in the form of a blogging, letter writing, and any kind of art creations to give away or sell, volunteering anywhere, or making phone calls to relatives that need social interaction.

Your schedule may look something like this:

Monday:  Bike or swim 10-20 minutes.  Eat Healthy

Tuesday:  Create for others (your work), meditate.  Eat Healthy

Wednesday:  Bike or swim 10-20 minutes

Thursday:  Meditate or breath practice.  Eat Healthy

Friday:  Yoga, create for others.  Eat Healthy

Saturday:  Have fun

Sunday:  Have fun

Offensive Health

My mid 20’s marked the beginning of my journey to health. I was hardly an adult but I was experiencing pain that I began to identify as something that could easily spiral to chronicity. Weekly migraines, high blood pressure, viruses, infections, allergies, depression, intolerance, fatigue, neck pain and hand pain were things I didn’t think I’d experience until my golden years. My hobby became figuring out food— a BS in Biology taught me that medicine is made out of food so I figured if I ate the right things I may be able to stay out of the local Care Now.

Health can offend. I had absolutely NO CLUE that my decision to seek health and happiness may offend so many. My now husband, then boyfriend, accompanied me to Whole Foods for my first effort in transformation. He rubbed his head as I searched for a non- dairy milk, he sighed as I picked up a bottle of spirulina, and he nearly passed out when I bought almost everything in the produce aisle to prepare my meals fo
r the week. Finally, I turned to him and jokingly said, “You’re acting like I’ve decided to do crack cocaine!” We had a hearty laugh and headed to the register. Maybe he was realizing that he would be dragged into the same eating habits if he stuck with me.

One change a week was my motto. Every week I would pick something to change: Minimize dairy and eliminate milk, eat healthy grains, eliminate processed foods, rid myself of gluten, no more “juice” that isn’t really juice, read all ingredient labels, try everything in the produce aisle, experiment with one new recipe a week, read more books, do more research, and learn about organic and non-GMO food options.

Almost 10 years later my healthy habits now include yoga, meditation, exercise, use of essential oils, and homemade/chemical free household products, juicing, and incorporating alternative therapies (which I think shouldn’t be called alternative as they are the practices of our great grandparents). Yet every change continues to offend some people. I am amazed by how many conversations I’ve had trying to convince a disbelieving audience or defend my current practice. More eyes have rolled my direction than I care to count. Things that are my “Zen” and bring me happiness, and health have truly made some people irate, and I’ve lost a few friendships over it.

The norms of the world necessitate my constant tolerance, which is not always reciprocated. The planetary demands to conform have never suited me—not because I like to be different or cool but because I am drawn like anyone else to the things that bring me health, happiness, and joy. My antidepressant is exercise, my migraine deterrent is non-dairy milk, and my allergy pills are my oils and juice. Yes, I find myself in the local urgent care every now and then but it’s WAY less than the 4-5 times a year as in my early 20’s. I’ve eradicated the need for blood pressure medicine, daily Zyrtec, Flonase, Excedrine Migraine, and Celexa (an antidepressant)—yes, I was taking all of these at the ripe age of 22.

I’m sharing all of this so that you don’t feel alone if your efforts to heal and be healthy are not supported by your friends, family, coworkers, or spouse. It is my hobby, it brings me joy, and I don’t try to control anyone else’s hobby—maybe this will help it be accepted or at least tolerated. I’m extremely proud of all of the things I’ve taught myself through the wisdom of the health and alternative community (thank you Hay House radio, and the countless authors in the self-help and health/nutrition section of Half Price Books and Amazon).

XL hugs and kisses!